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So you figure you don’t have a “Green Thumb”? Then this short tutorial just might be what you are looking for. 

Thanks to Minde Wagner for sharing “How to Plant Outdoor Potted Flowers” with our readers. 

Time to play in the dirt.

Introduction

Flowers planted in June

Pot 1 latest pictureThe flowers planted in June – photographed on July 4th.

Potted flowers July 2013 2

This article will guide you through the process of creating an outdoor potted flower arrangement. It will instruct on how to plant “partial-sun” flowers in a plastic pot.

This project should be done in spring in order to experience the full blooms in summer. Be prepared to use gentle hands throughout the entire process, and consider the idea that you may get a little dirty.

Before you begin, there are four basic things you need to think about:

1. The location of your flower pot

The location of your flower pot is categorized into 3 different types of sun exposure:

  • Full Sun – minimum 6 hours of direct sunlight each day.
  • Partial Sun – 3 hours of direct sunlight each day.
  • Shade – less than 3 hours of direct sunlight each day.

2. The type of flower pot.

The two main types of flower pots available are:

  • Clay (ceramic) pots – for herbs and flowers that like dry soil.
  • Plastic pots – for most flowers.

3. The types of flowers you should buy

The types of flowers you buy should match the sun exposure of the flower pot location. You should find similar exposure symbols on each of the plants when you purchase them:

  • Full Sun – minimum 6 hours of direct sunlight each day.
  • Partial Sun – 3 hours of direct sunlight each day.
  • Shade – less than 3 hours of direct sunlight.

4. Your ability to maintain and care for the flowers

You should be prepared to water the flowers each day and remove the dead flowers and leaves regularly. Removing dead flowers promotes new blooms.

List of Materials and Equipment

All of the following materials can be found at Home Depot, Canadian Tire, Superstore, or any local garden shop. The flowers and equipment may vary in type and style. Some items are seasonal and only available in spring and early summer. Most items are available all year.

  1. Small Garden Shovel
  2. Water Hose with Shower Nozzle (or Watering Can)
  3. Small-Medium Rocks (approximately 2 liters)
  4. Flowers.

Minimum requirement for this project:

  1. 1 x 5” Saratoga
  2. 3 x 2” Petunias
  3. 4 x 1” Lobelia
  4. Potting Soil Mix – minimum 60 liters.
  5. Scissors
  6. Garden Gloves
  7. Sheet of Plastic or Garbage Bag (size: 3ft x 2ft)
  8. Plastic Pot with drainage holes (size:16”top with 10” bottom).

Materials and Equipment Needed to Plant the Flowers

Materials and equipment

Steps to Planting Flowers in the Pot

Make sure to follow each of the steps and sub-directions in sequential order. The main steps include: (Step 1) set up materials and equipment, (Step 2) prepare the pot, (Step 3) prepare the flowers, (Step 4) plant the flowers, and (Step 5) water and care for the potted flowers.

Step 1: Set Up Materials and Equipment

  1. Purchase and have all materials and equipment ready.
  2. Put on gloves.
  3. Place the plastic on the ground to keep the area from getting dirty.
  4. Place the pot on the plastic to one side.

Plastic and Pot Set Up

Plastic and pot set up

Step 2: Prepare the Pot

  1. Put the rocks in the bottom of the pot
  2. Fill the pot with potting soil until just over ¾ full.
  3. Make sure you have enough soil reserved to fill the remainder ¼ of the pot.
  4. Dig 6 shallow holes in the soil.

Shallow Holes in the Soil

shallow holes in the soil

Step 3: Prepare the Flowers

Be gentle and take your time when handling the flowers. Try not to crush or break stems and leaves. Some breakage may happen by accident; this is usually OK. Most plants will recover from damage if cared for properly.

  1. Water the flowers using a gentle stream until the soil and roots are moist.
  2. Cut the plastic flower containers into individual pieces with the scissors.
  3. Arrange the flowers in the pot to visualize how you would like them while they are still in the plastic containers.

Cut the Plastic Flower Containers

Cut the containers

Arrange Flowers in the Pot

All plants in the pot

Step 4: Plant the Flowers

When handling the flowers, grasp gently near the base of the stems where they are strongest. Take your time and be careful with the stems and leaves.

  1. Hold the first container by the flower base, turn it upside down and look at the bottom.
  2. Remove any roots sticking out of the bottom container by pulling or cutting them.
  3. Hold the flower base with one hand and squeeze the bottom of the plastic container with your other hand.
  4. Keep squeezing the container and pushing the roots upward until the flowers and roots are out of the container.
  5. Gently break up the bottom of the roots so they are hanging loosely. (This will help the flower plant to grow quickly, and to its full potential, in the new soil.)
  6. Place the flowers and roots in one of the shallow holes in the pot.

***Repeat these steps 1-6 with each flower container you wish to plant***

Squeeze the Container and Push Roots Out

Squeeze container

Break up the Bottom Roots

Break up the bottom roots

 

Once you have all the flowers out of the plastic containers, the bottoms of the roots are gently broken up, and each plant is placed in the pot arranged as you like; you may proceed with the following steps.

  1. Scoop soil using the shovel, from the ¼ reserved potting soil, and put it around the base of the flower plant.
  2. Repeat step 7 for each flower plant in the pot.
  3. Fill the area around each flower plant from the remaining ¼ reserved soil until there are no roots showing.
  4. Gently press the soil around the base of each flower plant with your hands.

Scoop Soil and Fill the Area around Each Plant

Scoop soil and fill in

Step 5: Water and Care for the Plants

  1. Water the base of each flower plant in the pot, using a gentle stream of water.
  2. Wait for the water to soak in, and water again.
  3. Gently wash any soil off the leaves and flowers.
  4. Let the water fully drain out of the pot. (This may take 5-10 minutes.)
  5. Place the pot of planted flowers in the location you chose. (The flowers in this example will require a “Part Shade” location.)
  6. Water every second day, or keep soil moist.
  7. Pick off dead flowers and leaves every day, throw them away.

Water the Base of Each Flower Plant

Water the base of each flower plant

Finished Outdoor Potted Flowers

pots latest picture 2

Once you have completed Steps 1-5, the flower pot should look similar to this.

This photo taken July 4th, 2013,  about 3 weeks after planting

Flowers are now in full bloom

Potted flowers July 2013

More Information:

The flowers used in the above instructions can be found on these websites:

The flowers used in the above instructions can be found on these websites:

Here are some websites to help plan and care for your outdoor potted flowers:

Trouble Shooting and Problems

Below are some potential issues that you may encounter during this project and a list of suggested solutions.

Water does not drain from the soil.

  • The pot needs to have drainage holes.
  • Check to make sure the pot has drainage holes.
  • Check to see if the drainage holes are blocked.

The flowers are limp and the leaves are wilted.

  • Most flowers need to have moist soil.
  • Do not buy wilted, dried-out flowers.
  • Do not let the soil dry out.
  • Water the flowers before you begin planting.
  • Water the flowers after you finished planting.
  • Do not let the flowers sit exposed and out of the container without water for more than 1 hour.
  • Once you have finished planting the flowers and watering them, and the water has drained out of the pot; wait 24 hours for the flower plants to recover and leaves to strengthen.

There are many broken stems and leaves.

  • There may be flowers, stems, or leaves that break off in this process.
  • Be careful while handling the flower plants.
  • Remove any broken leaves or stems.
  • As long as there is a plant fully attached to the roots, the plant should grow and recover with continued care.

The soil dries out quickly.

  • Small pots dry out faster than large pots.
  • Small pots will need more frequent watering than larger pots.
  • Use water gel from your local flower shop to decrease watering times.

Warnings

The finished outdoor potted flowers in this project will be quite heavy and weigh approximately 50-60lbs.

  • Bring the materials and equipment near the location you chose for your flower pot.
  • Follow these directions near the location you choose for your flower pot.

Some flower plants may be poisonous, and should not be eaten.

  • Read the labels before purchasing flowers.

Copy Right

All photos by Minde Wagner.

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From the moment I first sipped Red Rooibos tea, I was hooked. On the lookout for a tea with interest, I had found one. Rich in taste, full of flavor, and loaded with antioxidants, this tea has a lot to offer.  That was several years ago.

While taking in the many sights, sounds and tastes of the 2012 West Coast Women’s Show, I made a point of paying a visit to Liz Bandelin’s Tega Tea booth. A welcome stop after spending the last few hours enjoying the endless displays of just about everything a woman could want – jewels, clothing, cosmetics, skincare, food, drink, entertainment and adult beverages.

The world slowed down as I enjoyed the tea tasting, along with a little flavorful chat. I treasured the moment.

I was pleased to see new additions to Liz’s already rich combinations and varieties – Chocolate Mint, Chai, Orange Spice, Lemon Hibiscus, Wild Berry and Green Rooibos teas to name a few. Based on my tasting, I decided to purchase the Winter Berry Blend and the Tropical Sunrise. I was already looking forward to a cup before retiring later that evening.

Tega Teas are the #1 ranked fair trade teas in Canada.  To learn why and to learn more about Rooibos and its many health benefits, go to    http://www.nu-tea.com

My next stop of interest –

Epic Cosmetics and their Clear 60 Minute Skin Care line.

We “mature” women are always on the look out for that special something – the miracle in a bottle that will fix it all. Well, maybe not all, but if it erased even a few years of lines and wrinkles (oh, it almost hurts to say that word) we are all over it.

Now, having said that, this “miracle in a bottle” must pass several very stringent tests. Having educated ourselves in the fine art of healthy living, we “mature” women, have become very discerning.

Not only does this miracle in a bottle have to be effective, it must be natural and toxin-free. No more sacrificing inner body health for outer body beauty. Those days are long gone.

Mladen and Tanya, a local scientist and his beautiful wife, work tirelessly to bring us this “miracle in a bottle”. Clear Skin Care is 100% natural, safe and toxin free, highly effective and loaded with anti-oxidants. Clear Skin Care is making its mark and flying off the shelves of local stores.

Did I mention it is effective? You see, I discovered this skin rejuvenating serum a year ago.

I haven’t even touched on the skin clearing capability this remarkable product has. Chronic problems like psoriasis, eczema, hives and various unknown skin conditions are erased or eliminated within hours or days.

Here’s a little secret. It’s not just for woman, nor is it just for the “mature” woman. Check out their website at  http://www.epic-cosmetics.com/

The treasures one can find at the West Coast Women’s Show are endless. If you missed this year’s show, be sure to make it a priority next year.

What do Tega Tea and Clear 60 Minute Skin Care have in common?

Me for one.

 

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A friend and I met for tea this morning and she reminded me that today was the last day of January!

2012 Carrie ©

The comment caught me off guard for a moment. 1/12th of the year is already behind us!

“Where have the last 31 days gone?” I asked myself. Before I could answer, my friend said, “the next thing you know, it’ll be Christmas.”

I gasped, and then quickly recovered, realizing we really do have almost 11 more months to prepare.

Every year many of us declare that December suddenly just “appeared” on our doorstep. How stupid is that? It comes around every year, exactly once every 12 months, or every 365 days; accept for this year which will be 366 days. There are no surprises here.

So this year, I am making a decision. No more surprises.

This year I am putting in my calender that I will start to organize myself today, so that I’m ready for December.

What will that look like?

Does that mean I will do more busy stuff to prepare for Christmas?

Here’s what that might look like, and NO, I do not intend to do more. It merely means that I intend to get the most out of the season, and I will not be caught off guard for the umpteenth time.

More questions come to mind…

Does that mean that I won’t still get the most out of the other months and seasons of the year, because I’m preoccupied with that one month of the year?

Enjoying the beauty of the moment - Jan 2012 Carrie ©

On the contrary, this will be a reminder  to enjoy the moment and season that comes with it.

Does that mean I will spend more money on Christmas?

Most certainly not. I intend to have the time to thoughtfully decide what it is I want to spend on Christmas, and, what I don’t want to spend on Christmas.

Another way to make the most of this wonderful month of the year is by intentionally thinking about who I want to spend it with.

Umm, not sure where aunt Susan fits in… but we’ve got almost 11 months to figure that out.

What about the preoccupation with gifts?

Throughout the year, many fabulous craft fairs and trade shows pop up  just about everywhere in the county. If I’m thinking creatively and ahead, gift giving can actually be fun to do.  I still believe that it’s the thought that counts, not the “how much did it cost?”.

So, that’s my decision.

2012 Carrie ©

January, you’ve done well. As you can see, I’ve had plenty of time to enjoy this season.

February, I have a very good reason to look forward to your extra day.

Yes, I’m ready for the rest of the 11 months.

December, 2012 is starting to look pretty inviting.

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Harvest time is a time to be thankful

After the storm that dismantled much of my garden a few weeks ago, with a little cleanup and tender loving care, the garden took on another form of beauty.

On Canadian Thanksgiving (October 9) we  had a family and friends dinner/ party at the garden farm ‘Red Barn’.

Everyone brought something, (we brought a turkey). We didn’t spare the sweet and the savory.

A warm fire in the fire pit nearby invited us to come and sit, share stories and enjoy the art of roasting marshmallows.

This is what the day was like…

Mother and daughter, gardening companions – Thanksgiving day harvest 2011 Carrie ©
Towards the end of the day we harvested beets, carrots, cucumbers, kale,  lettuce, and a few last hour green beans.
Birdhouse ready for rent in spring  – 2011 Carrie ©
We share our Sunflower seeds with the birds – 2011 Carrie ©
Alyssum, Sedum, Calendula – 2011 Carrie ©
Leek among the Nasturiums – 2011 Carrie ©
Leeks can be harvested up until February. We’re looking forward to leek soup this winter. 
Me in my garden Thanksgiving day – 2011 Carrie ©

Am I thankful for my garden or what? 

Next post – vote for your favorite vintage apron design. 

Sneak preview – I’m wearing one of them.

Thank you for visiting.


					

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A floral feast found in my garden

A few days after I took these flower photographs,  a wet and wild storm lasting the night, dismantled much of the garden.

But... this flower photographing day I had a great day. The garden amazed me with it’s wonders.

Photo Gallery of flowers 

Bee in a Sunflower 2011 Carrie ©

Rustic Sunflower variety - 2011 Carrie ©

Teddy Bear Sunflower 2011 Carrie ©

I don’t remember planting him… it appears he is one of the garden volunteers.

Bumble Bee and Honey Bee on Sedum 2011 Carrie ©

Chair in the Crocosmia Red Star - 2011 Carrie ©

Hummingbirds love this flower. We had many visits from them this summer.

Love Lies Bleeding 2011 Carrie ©

These flowers make a stunning addition to an already stunning flower arrangement.

Yellow Daisies 2011 Carrie ©

Red Nasturium 2011 Carrie ©

As well as helping to keep the garden free from bad bugs, Nasturiums are edible, and very healthy.

 Herbsarespecial.com article states that scientific research has found the plant has:

  • a natural antibiotic action that is fast-working in the body 
  • The antibiotic agent, tromalyt, has been found in the urine within one hour of digesting the herb
  • This antibiotic does not interfere with intestinal flora
  • It has been found to be effective against some microorganisms that have built up resistance to common antibiotic drugs

I enjoy a few whenever I’m in the garden. They have a peppery taste that goes great with a fresh salad.

Smiling faces - Pansies 2011 Carrie ©

A little nibbled around the edges, but still smiling.

Yellow Nasturiums 2011 Carrie ©

Virginia Spiderwort 2011 Carrie ©

Echinacea 2011 Carrie ©

Hyacinth - 2011 Carrie ©

Another volunteer blooming somewhat late in the season.

Rose Champion (Lychnis) 2011 Carrie ©

Nasturiums among the Sunflowers & cucumbers - 2011 Carrie ©

A bee enjoying the California Poppies 2011 Carrie ©

I can hardly wait until next spring to see what floral surprises are awaiting.

disclaimer: The content on this post is meant for informational purposes only, and is not intended for use as official health consultation

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Sweet red beets.  This year my organic garden has a perfect crop of red Beets.  I am so happy!


Red Beets in my garden - Carrie ©

Why do I love my beets so?

Because red beets:

  1. are sweet and juicy ( I never realized how delicious raw beets are)
  2. are anti-carcinogenic
  3. are high in antioxidants
  4. increases oxygen-carrying ability of the blood by up to 400%
  5. were traditionally used to battle leukemia
  6. have been shown to inhibit colon and stomach cancer
  7. help reduce serum cholesterol
  8. help to normalize blood pressure
  9. are a powerful cleanser and blood purifier
  10. help to keep your arteries elastic
  11. help to prevent varicose veins
  12. are high in folic acid
  13. stimulate the function of liver cells
  14. protect the liver and bile ducts
  15. are highly alkaline
  16. help to relieve constipation
  17. are anti-inflammatory
  18. help in detoxification

If you are not use to consuming beets, give your body time to get accustomed to it. This is a powerful food.

(Warning: you may experience red stool!)

Beet juice is so powerful that it you may feel dizzy during cleansing. This discomfort is normal as toxins are being eliminated. It is advised to drink plenty of water to help in the elimination of toxins.”

Harvesting my Red Beets - Carrie ©

Ways we enjoy our sweet red beets:

  • Washed, peeled and sliced into thin slices (served with home-made dip)
  • Grated fresh or diced and added to one of our many varieties of fresh salads
  • Juiced
  • Washed and steamed for no longer than 15 minutes
  • Beet leaves are filled with nutrients as well. Washed and steamed or added to  juicing

2011 Carrie ©

Beets prepared for steaming - Carrie ©

Red beet and carrot juice recipe

  • 1 whole Red Beet (leaves included if desired)
  • 2 medium sized Carrots (green tops included if desired)
  • 1 Apple

Juice and drink immediately.

This is one of my favorite “get started” in the morning juice recipes.

You’re sure to enjoy this next recipe…

Beet and cucumber salad recipe

1 whole raw beet, peel and diced

1 small/medium cucumber diced

1 small sweet onion diced

add dried or fresh dill

add 3 Tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar

1 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive oil

Sea Salt to taste

a sprinkle of Mrs. Dash

mix

Let sit in the fridge for a day

Serve with a meal or enjoy alone

Drink plenty of water.

For more detailed information about the benefits of red Beets,

http://bit.ly/oSo3bV

http://bit.ly/qg0VN

disclaimer: The content on this post is meant for informational purposes only, and is not intended for use as official health consultation


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Rocky at Cascade Falls - Carrie ©

Rocky, Rocket Budwiser was a happy dog who lived a long, happy life.

On August 24, 2011, Rocky our 13 year old Golden Retriever, had a mishap.

Our Sweet (Sr.) Rocky April 16, 1998 - August 24, 2011 - Carrie ©

Somehow he partly slipped down the steep embankment at the back of our home while reaching for some tasty blades of grass. At least that’s what we think happened.

A neighbor (for whom we are so thankful) saw him struggling to get back up, and helped him, but… the effort was too much for Rocky’s heart.

He passed away within the next 15 minutes as we held him in our arms and told him how much we loved him.

Rocky had arthritis in his rear knees which left him with little strength in his back end.

A visit to the garden taken this spring - Carrie ©

Other than that, he was in “good shape for an old dog”, our friend the vet told us just last week.

We buried him in the field at the farm where we have our garden. It seemed appropriate.

Rocky RIP - Carrie ©

Horses at the farm - Carrie ©

He loved the farm, the horses, the sheep and the chickens.

We remember him as alert and engaging, loving and gentle, sweet and smart.

Checking out his Christmas present - Carrie ©

A very handsome dog, Rocket Budwiser - Carrie ©

Rocky inviting us to join him for a walk in the fresh snow - Carrie ©

For those of you who left him treats when dropping off courier packages, or newspapers…he felt special and watched for you.  Thank you.

Friends - a man and his dog - Carrie ©

Rocky loved much and was much loved.

We miss you Rockster.

Water sports at Cascade Falls - Carrie ©

Rocky was included in many of my paintings.

Sewing Circle - Carrie ©

Rocky sketch for Sewing Circle - Carrie ©

Rocky and lady 3 for Sewing Circle - Carrie ©

Fishing with a Friend - Carrie ©


					

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