Posts Tagged ‘sunflowers’

Harvest time is a time to be thankful

After the storm that dismantled much of my garden a few weeks ago, with a little cleanup and tender loving care, the garden took on another form of beauty.

On Canadian Thanksgiving (October 9) we  had a family and friends dinner/ party at the garden farm ‘Red Barn’.

Everyone brought something, (we brought a turkey). We didn’t spare the sweet and the savory.

A warm fire in the fire pit nearby invited us to come and sit, share stories and enjoy the art of roasting marshmallows.

This is what the day was like…

Mother and daughter, gardening companions – Thanksgiving day harvest 2011 Carrie ©
Towards the end of the day we harvested beets, carrots, cucumbers, kale,  lettuce, and a few last hour green beans.
Birdhouse ready for rent in spring  – 2011 Carrie ©
We share our Sunflower seeds with the birds – 2011 Carrie ©
Alyssum, Sedum, Calendula – 2011 Carrie ©
Leek among the Nasturiums – 2011 Carrie ©
Leeks can be harvested up until February. We’re looking forward to leek soup this winter. 
Me in my garden Thanksgiving day – 2011 Carrie ©

Am I thankful for my garden or what? 

Next post – vote for your favorite vintage apron design. 

Sneak preview – I’m wearing one of them.

Thank you for visiting.


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A floral feast found in my garden

A few days after I took these flower photographs,  a wet and wild storm lasting the night, dismantled much of the garden.

But... this flower photographing day I had a great day. The garden amazed me with it’s wonders.

Photo Gallery of flowers 

Bee in a Sunflower 2011 Carrie ©

Rustic Sunflower variety - 2011 Carrie ©

Teddy Bear Sunflower 2011 Carrie ©

I don’t remember planting him… it appears he is one of the garden volunteers.

Bumble Bee and Honey Bee on Sedum 2011 Carrie ©

Chair in the Crocosmia Red Star - 2011 Carrie ©

Hummingbirds love this flower. We had many visits from them this summer.

Love Lies Bleeding 2011 Carrie ©

These flowers make a stunning addition to an already stunning flower arrangement.

Yellow Daisies 2011 Carrie ©

Red Nasturium 2011 Carrie ©

As well as helping to keep the garden free from bad bugs, Nasturiums are edible, and very healthy.

 Herbsarespecial.com article states that scientific research has found the plant has:

  • a natural antibiotic action that is fast-working in the body 
  • The antibiotic agent, tromalyt, has been found in the urine within one hour of digesting the herb
  • This antibiotic does not interfere with intestinal flora
  • It has been found to be effective against some microorganisms that have built up resistance to common antibiotic drugs

I enjoy a few whenever I’m in the garden. They have a peppery taste that goes great with a fresh salad.

Smiling faces - Pansies 2011 Carrie ©

A little nibbled around the edges, but still smiling.

Yellow Nasturiums 2011 Carrie ©

Virginia Spiderwort 2011 Carrie ©

Echinacea 2011 Carrie ©

Hyacinth - 2011 Carrie ©

Another volunteer blooming somewhat late in the season.

Rose Champion (Lychnis) 2011 Carrie ©

Nasturiums among the Sunflowers & cucumbers - 2011 Carrie ©

A bee enjoying the California Poppies 2011 Carrie ©

I can hardly wait until next spring to see what floral surprises are awaiting.

disclaimer: The content on this post is meant for informational purposes only, and is not intended for use as official health consultation

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Breakfast in my garden - Carrie ©

I took this Month’s Theme photo very early one hot July morning. Chairs that were meant for the garbage dump, now nestle invitingly among  the Sunflowers, Cukes and Nasturtiums.

Cukes and Nasturtiums are two great Companion Plants.

How do Nasturtiums make good companion plants?

Their job in the garden is to excrete a strong essence into the air and soil.  This will help you in your fight against aphids, white fly and also root pests. This essence is secreted into the soil where it works for you to deter plant pests.

You can also plant Nasturtiums between all cabbage family plants, fruit trees, melons, pumpkins, potatoes.

Nasturtiums are very healthy to eat.

These flowers are high in vitamin C, iron and other minerals, and are a powerful antibiotic, antimicrobial, antioxidant .

Try adding them to a fresh green salad – you’ll discover a peppery, juicy taste which is quite delightful.You can eat the hot pungent seeds as well.

I enjoy munching on a few Nasturtium flowers along with some Sugar Snap Peas and a juicy carrot, while working in my garden.

Blue chairs under an umbrella- Carrie ©

Natures flower arrangement in an old chair - Carrie ©

I love this chair. The brilliant orange/red flowers attract bees and hummingbirds. They are sure to visit me, when I visit the garden in the early hours of the morning.

Blue chair amongst wild flowers- Carrie ©

Some things I learned this summer:

  • the garlic and onions I planted throughout the garden worked amazingly well. Very few bad bugs and worms to speak of.
  • plant rosemary by the beans
  • don’t plant garlic around the beans
  • the cabbage family likes dill and vice versa
  • watermelon is hard to grow in this climate
  • pumpkins take a lot of food and nurturing – big takers
  • beans and peas are givers, giving back nitrogen to the soil so move them around in the garden each year.

Extravagant poppies - Carrie ©

Love Lies Bleeding - Carrie ©

Rustic sunflower - Carrie ©

Brilliant pinks - Carrie ©

Broccoli bunch - Carrie ©

Just picked and perfect - Carrie ©

Baskets of blessings – Carrie ©

Romaine and strawberries- Carrie ©

Zucchini - Carrie ©

Dill amongst the peas - Carrie ©

Garden Path - taken in July - Carrie ©

This 100 ft. by 20 ft. organic garden turned out to be one of the best things that could ever happen to me .

I’ve been planning to get back into some sort of  ‘get back into shape’ program for the past year or so…well, I found it. Not only do I have the most amazing, bountiful, beautiful garden,  (Thank you God – you are the amazing master gardener), but I also am on an exercise program that I actually enjoy.

What to do for my exercise program during the winter months?…that’s another blog.


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Cabin fever refers to the reaction that takes place when a person is  shut in, for an extended period.

Symptoms include restlessness, irritability, forgetfulness, laughter, and excessive sleeping. (Wikipeda)

I figure it’s time to announce SPRING. I’m sitting snug in my little office, listening to the wind howling, recalling the snow and rain earlier today, and wondering what will the weather be like tomorrow.

Regardless of what tomorrow will be like, I have decided to announce Spring.

To quote a church bulletin board. “Faith is – the Robin that sings before the dawn.”

My announcement of Spring comes with a new “theme” for Nuggets of Gold blog. The Sunflower theme.

One winter I was starving for sunshine. I sat down and painted these sunflowers.

Sunflowers - acylic  by Carrie ©

Sunflowers - acrylic by Carrie ©

I did a little research on colors and how they effect us.

I found that Yellow captures the joy of sunshine and communicates happiness. (among other things)

Orange evokes excitement, enthusiasm and is an energetic color. (among other things)

So, until Spring opens its doors to deliver us from what we call Cabin Fever, put an orange on your desk.  Or you can drop in and visit my blog whenever you need a “color” fix.

You can learn more about how colors effect our mood at:



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