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Posts Tagged ‘vegetables’

Breakfast in my garden - Carrie ©

I took this Month’s Theme photo very early one hot July morning. Chairs that were meant for the garbage dump, now nestle invitingly among  the Sunflowers, Cukes and Nasturtiums.


Cukes and Nasturtiums are two great Companion Plants.

How do Nasturtiums make good companion plants?

Their job in the garden is to excrete a strong essence into the air and soil.  This will help you in your fight against aphids, white fly and also root pests. This essence is secreted into the soil where it works for you to deter plant pests.

You can also plant Nasturtiums between all cabbage family plants, fruit trees, melons, pumpkins, potatoes.

Nasturtiums are very healthy to eat.

These flowers are high in vitamin C, iron and other minerals, and are a powerful antibiotic, antimicrobial, antioxidant .

Try adding them to a fresh green salad – you’ll discover a peppery, juicy taste which is quite delightful.You can eat the hot pungent seeds as well.

I enjoy munching on a few Nasturtium flowers along with some Sugar Snap Peas and a juicy carrot, while working in my garden.

Blue chairs under an umbrella- Carrie ©

Natures flower arrangement in an old chair - Carrie ©

I love this chair. The brilliant orange/red flowers attract bees and hummingbirds. They are sure to visit me, when I visit the garden in the early hours of the morning.

Blue chair amongst wild flowers- Carrie ©


Some things I learned this summer:

  • the garlic and onions I planted throughout the garden worked amazingly well. Very few bad bugs and worms to speak of.
  • plant rosemary by the beans
  • don’t plant garlic around the beans
  • the cabbage family likes dill and vice versa
  • watermelon is hard to grow in this climate
  • pumpkins take a lot of food and nurturing – big takers
  • beans and peas are givers, giving back nitrogen to the soil so move them around in the garden each year.

Extravagant poppies - Carrie ©

Love Lies Bleeding - Carrie ©

Rustic sunflower - Carrie ©

Brilliant pinks - Carrie ©

Broccoli bunch - Carrie ©

Just picked and perfect - Carrie ©

Baskets of blessings – Carrie ©

Romaine and strawberries- Carrie ©

Zucchini - Carrie ©

Dill amongst the peas - Carrie ©

Garden Path - taken in July - Carrie ©

This 100 ft. by 20 ft. organic garden turned out to be one of the best things that could ever happen to me .

I’ve been planning to get back into some sort of  ‘get back into shape’ program for the past year or so…well, I found it. Not only do I have the most amazing, bountiful, beautiful garden,  (Thank you God – you are the amazing master gardener), but I also am on an exercise program that I actually enjoy.

What to do for my exercise program during the winter months?…that’s another blog.

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The tasty, nutritious asparagus falls under the category of super foods in my books.

Asparagus photo

Here’s what I learned about asparagus.

Asparagus is:

* Rich in proteins

* High in fibre low in carbohydrates and calories

* An excellent source of vitamin K, folate, vitamin C and A as well as many other minerals and B vitamins.

* Calcium and magnesium are found in the idea ratio of 2:1.

* Good for your heart

* Good for your gastrointestinal tract and colon

* Good food to help with depression

* Considered a diuretic

* Has anti-inflammatory effects

* Helps detoxify the body

* Good for nursing mothers – stimulates milk production

* Has anti-fungal and antiviral qualities

* Helps prevent bladder and urinary track infections

* Great for your capillaries – helps with preventing bruising and varicose veins

* Suppose to help stop hair loss

Almost too good to be true? That is an impressive list. And that’s not all I found. I left plenty of the supposed health benefits out – because it did sound just a bit too good to be true and would require that I spend a lot more time researching.

Having said that, I think we’ve got the picture.

How to best prepare asparagus. Lightly steamed is the most nutritious. This only takes a few minutes so don’t walk away from the stove. Use glass or stainless steel pots. When done, the stems should be a bright green color and still have a crispness to them. Sprinkle lightly with sea salt or Mrs. Dash and serve with a meal – or eat it all by itself as a snack.

Asparagus is a member of the lily family. Other vegetables in the lily family include leek, onions, and garlic.

I think you would agree that Asparagus is an excellent food to incorporate into your diet on a regular basis. Sometimes people avoid eating asparagus because of the smell excreted in the urine subsequent to ingestion. An amino acid called asparagine found in abundance in asparagus, is the reason behind this. Asparagine helps the body to cleanse itself of waste material.

A couple of good resources:

http://bit.ly/m2Bhv

http://bit.ly/2VrK7x

disclaimer: The content on this post is meant for informational purposes only, and is not intended for use as official health consultation.

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